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The world is a complex and dynamic place. Earth takes part in an intricate dance with the moon, surrounding planets, our sun, other stars and entire galaxies. All interact with one another determining our position in the universe. On a much smaller scale, humans consist of trillions of cells that work together to let us walk, run, and think. Each such single living cell is driven by the interaction of about a trillion non-living molecules. Life at all scales is complex, dynamic, and difficult to understand. All these examples, however, have in common that they obey the basic laws of physics. Although we can apply those laws to understand a small part of each system, many interacting parts can behave wildly different and unpredictable. By combining theory and experiment, our lab aims at understanding such system dynamics, studying living (Dynamics in Biology) and non-living (Dynamics in Physics) systems.

News

  • Jan explains his research in a video

    June 2019

    The project “Wetenschap Uitgedokterd” aims to get young scientists to leave their comfort zone in the lab and puts them in front of a camera to clearly explain their research to the general public in 3 minutes. Watch Jan’s video here (only in Dutch). Well done Jan, crystal clear!

  • Alexandra starts a new challenge at the FWO

    May 2019

    After almost 3 years together, Alexandra is leaving the lab to reinforce the Research Foundation – Flanders focussing on research policies and strategies concerning fundamental research. As the first member of the group, Alexandra played a crucial role in setting up the lab from the very beginning and was a wonderful person to have around. We wish her all the best and she will be greatly missed in the lab!

  • Eternal sunshine of the spotless cycle?

    April 2019

    In a recent study, Purvis and colleagues (Chao et al, 2019) quantify cell cycle phase durations in human cells and propose a model whereby cell cycle progression in single cells is a succession of uncoupled, memoryless phases, each composed of a characteristic rate and number of steps. They also suggest that having such memoryless phases is a feature of healthy cells, while cancer cells have correlated phases. Silvia Santos (Crick, London) and Lendert have written a News&Views piece about this article.